• Dip. ht 30" to 31", dia 5.5", br 3, bc 23, semi, Noc, EM Lipstick Spitfire is a tough, high performing, vigorous, hardy, fertile plant that provides the hybridizer with excellent color and near white breeding opportunities. Named in honor of the famous British single-engine fighter of WWII, Lipstick Spitfire is foolishly pod fertile and always comes back strong the following year. Breeding potential of LS is excellent. Loch Ness Monster provides rich color variations from pinks to rose and lavender to white. Forsyth Flaming Snow provides excellent genetics for white breeding, green throats, and the possibility of edge-no-eye color distribution on the petals and sepals (though I have yet to see this in the kids). It has a strong scape with 3 to 4-way branching and carries an average of 23 buds, with a high count of 29. Flowers present at an upward and outward angle. Lipstick Spitfire is a ruffled rose to pink self with light midribs and a yellow throat. Itís darker in cool early season temperatures, and lightens with hot weather. Ruffling improves with heat, yet heat does not seem to impede its pod fertility. Blooms sometimes spot in colder weather when dew is heavy, but that trait is not prevalent as the weather warms. I have not used it as much as I should in hybridizing, but the seedlings I have seen a range in color from clear rose hues to very nice pinks, nice whites, with some seedlings showing substantially larger blooms. Depending on pollen parent, Lipstick Spitfire will breed significantly larger in one generation. The kids show greatly improved complexion with good pollen parents. Lipstick Spitfire is being grown in two gardens in Minnesota, and multiple locations in North Dakota. It is doing exceptionally well in all.
  • Dip. ht 38" dia 9", br 2, bc 11, semi, Noc, M, UF: quilled crispate Snortin’ Whiskey is a taut quilled crispate that has been consistent in form since first bloom in 2006. Dan Bachman’s Gail Braunstein provides hardiness, color, and genetics for a great scape, and while you might think Ned’s Pueblo Dancer would contribute a relaxed, cascade attitude to the blooms, the two parents produced this highly unexpected result. Why wait so long to bring this to market? We had planted it on the edge of a densely planted seedling bed bordered by mature Norway spruce. It was there for four years and didn’t increase well, so we moved it in 2011 and planted two divisions to see if they would increase. They did, a lot! Why the low bud count? The first couple of years in its new spot the scapes were adequate at two to 3-way branching with bud counts in the mid to high teens. However, the registered bud count was taken in 2014 from two overgrown clumps. The best scape we recorded in 2014 was 4 x 18, but about half the scapes on those clumps had low bud counts and drove the average count lower. (Moral of the story: divide the clumps.) The lineout row has looked much better over the last two years. The flower shows excellent form and remarkable consistency, and it’s a good parent for passing on cascade and quilling attributes. Initially we recommended it for similar climates or those to the south since Pueblo Dancer has not been hardy for us, however, it is being tested in a garden in North Dakota and two in Minnesota. It is doing well in all three locations. Dbl. $75